1. #1
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    Mature Audiences Female anatomy study. C&C/Help please

    I seem to have trouble with females looking pretty... I am going for a more realistic/slightly exaggerated look. Super-hero female style, but i would love to do realistic face/skin detailing. I have a ton of reference and try to make beautiful looking women and they always come out not quite right. I feel like all the pieces are there and im just missing something. Their faces especially just dont feel beautiful to me. And i feel like the body isnt bad but im still not thinking "DAMN!" which is what im going for lol. Anybody else run into this issue? Help please?

    https://www.artstation.com/maximusin3d

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    Alright,

    I am no expert by any means and I know this is a almost a year in reply, so you more than likely learned all kinds of new skills and features in your art but since nobody replied I just present some findings of my studies that may be applicable to you.

    With that, pretty much all I make is female figures, so I stare at naked references (women) alot, heh (I am studying!)

    - In classical Greek sculptures, many women and goddesses have realist proportions and a modest but smooth face, yet one thing makes them pop out: Maternal sexuality, the appearance that they can harbor and a healthy baby, fertility. In modern (mainly Western) society, we tend to gravitate towards skinny women, and that is fine and all, but how the Greeks in antiquity portrayed their worshiped women was with "Wide hips", realistic but also deliberately stylized.

    - Its a specific base shape and proportion, the horizontally long rectangle; bearing in mind this is just base proportion. You can match it to the shoulders, shorten it to the initiation or tip end of the deltoids, your choice if you are doing a concept. If the hips are squared, it tends to appear more masculine.

    - Some agree and some disagree with this: the elongated triangle (the tip pointed towards the start neck or clavicles). This simple base shape (for some) creates the appearance of feminine attributes. If the tip is pointed towards to the groins, it tends to appear more masculine.

    - Softness vrs Hardness of muscles and where the bone meets the skin. I notice here and in classical art, feminine characters even with heroic attributes have softness even with the muscle heads and boney areas. The bones on the face (and hips, and acromial, ect) are respected but still soft. The more detailed and hard those become the more masculine and or athletic a character appears. What helps me (before I start creating body builder women lol) is to respect the boney areas in low subs, and in high subs (like 5 or 6: 3+ million polys) fill in the pockets with Clay on low intensity or depth.

    - On the side profile, there is a pretty and soft teardrop shape of the hips and the buttocks, with the tip pointing towards the external obliques and the roundness as the edge of the buttocks. It is not exactly this shape and varies from person to person, but sometimes when trouble shooting a model I put this shape in and then the character becomes more sexually engaging.

    - The face test (if you are trying to achieve modern Western standard sexual appeal): this can be trial and error. Remove the hair, is she still pretty? Alot of times I see artist overly focus the jawline of female characters (meaning overly detail, not particularly the shape). This can accidentally create a masculine character. The jaws of some beautiful women can be actually pretty large! Take for example the women who Miranda from Mass Effect 2 was modeled from (forgot her name) but she a larger then average jaw with a split in her chin that is very distinctive, yet it is super soft, giving her a additive feminine attribute, offsetting the jaw, creating unusual visual interest. Brow size as well. You can (despite what many artist may attest to) get away with a more prominent brow (but bear in mind it makes sapient sapients look more simian). All humans have a brow, size varies, but women's brows are soft and tend to be a bit smaller. Septum and philtrum distance as well as ducklips must be taken into consideration when dealing with human faces. It can make or break a face, check side profile's silo to avoid ducklips, check the relational distances of sept and phil to avoid ape like qualities.

    Sorry for the essay, I just get into studying women's physical beauty. A good practice (for fun and study) is to find reference of average (only on the outside) looking women that are attractive to you (not movie stars; in the West they are pretty linear and somewhat seriously unrealistic IMO; a example of this that nearly freightens me is that women who was in the recent Ninja turtles moves and Transformers, she does not look like a human IMO), and do some speed sculpts of their face, body, or both.

    Hope this helps!

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    Default Thank you!

    WOW! THank you so much for the detailed review of my work. I appreciate constructive criticism as it makes me a better artist and the essay really means a lot. I may have to revisit this one. I have learned much since posting this but my anatomy is still very much lacking and especially my females need practice. I think you raise many valid points. Again thank you so much
    https://www.artstation.com/maximusin3d

    "There is no tomorrow!"
    -Apollo Creed

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