1. #16
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    that’s beautiful work

  2. #17
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    I've been interested in sculpting classic decorations and architecture in zbrush for quite some time. But I find there's a serious lack of resources on the subject. Are there and tutorials or information on this subject anywhere? I've seen information on how to build these kinds of details in traditional modeling programs, but it seems to me, that being such an organic shape, it would be much faster to sculpt something like this. But then the lack of information on how to do it makes me think maybe that's not the case? How do you get such crisp, finalized organic shapes with only sculpting tools?

  3. #18
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    I've been interested in sculpting classic decorations and architecture in zbrush for quite some time. But I find there's a serious lack of resources on the subject. Are there and tutorials or information on this subject anywhere? I've seen information on how to build these kinds of details in traditional modeling programs, but it seems to me, that being such an organic shape, it would be much faster to sculpt something like this. But then the lack of information on how to do it makes me think maybe that's not the case? How do you get such crisp, finalized organic shapes with only sculpting tools?
    Thank you for question Kroswind. The point is, there is no resources at all, to be honest.

    I'll give you one example. Imagine all your live you learn the human anatomy and know it perfectly, then somebody asked you to sculpt kangaroo, you probably can, but the anatomy is totally different and you have to make some new study.

    This is why there is no a good lessons, people who make lessons do not know the anatomy of classical decoration, those who knows mostly work in real life due to flaws of contemporary 3d print technology. Those who work with CNC mostly use ArtCAM(weird app for my opinion).

    As for crisp but smooth lines. It is simple. Make a sphere and try stroke of Dam-Standart on it. It would be smooth and crisp. So, when sculpt think about volume, how smooth the base form, then it would be easier to add crisp edge.

    Although it isn't as simple of course. But i do not use retopology, low poly etc, except for base mouldings.

  4. #19
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    This is a short video with i think illustrated what i said https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wLujBuvBaw4

  5. #20
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    Hi,

    Can I ask what file did you use from zbrush to CNC software. Obj. or Stl. ?

    The CNC people I am talking to only want to use a nurbs, surface type file.

    Looking forward to your reply.

    Simon

  6. #21
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    Can I ask what file did you use from zbrush to CNC software. Obj. or Stl.
    Hi,

    I mostly use .3dm now, just because Rhino can mix obj-fbx and CAD data. As for the nurbs it is only important when you use more than 3 axes machine. With nurbs you can calculate normals to keep the cutter perpendicular to the surface. This is important for smoothness of course but not too much for this kind of models.

  7. #22
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    Sculpterra thanks for your help!

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