1. #1

    Default Triceratops

    Well here's my first attempt at doing any work in ZBrush.
    I created a base mesh in Maya and then worked entirely in ZB2. I opened it in ZB3 just to get some screen shots with the new red wax texture.

    tri2.JPG
    tri4.JPG
    tri1.JPG

    This is still a work in progress. I'm still working on the details and I'd like to add some color to it later.

  2. #2
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    I like the overall mesh, it's sick. Though it's seem like you could go up one subvision. Maybe it's the image or maybe not but I could still see polyfaces around certain areas. I would like to see how it look textured. The horns looks like it part of the skin ( or graphed to it) maybe you can pull out the skin around the horns and bump it and sharper the mouth. for example:


    triceratops2.gif


    All in all, it's a good piece for your first model in Zbrush.

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    Looks great! You really don't need to conform the model to anybody else's interpretation of what they think this critter would have looked like. The renditions of these creatures are based on fossil remains of bones. It's like trying to reconstruct what someone looked like based only on their skull.

    It's also kind of interesting to see people critique models of the human form. You hear stuff like the arm is to long, fingers to short, etc. When in reality you look around at real people and see the scope of variation in the human form. Seems like we all have a mental image of what we perceive as the perfect form.
    Last edited by bisenberger; 06-02-07 at 04:38 PM.

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    Very nice model Thanks for sharing.

    Marc Boulay would be your best source for an expert critique.

    Blaine
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Chillllllllllllllin

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    Thanks for the comments and critiques.

    Karrma --
    Yeah, I think I will sharpen up the beak and maybe add some more definition around the base of the horns. I can't subdivide anymore though. But thanks for the advice man.


    bisenberger --
    I know what you mean, 'cause this model is supposed to be very stylized. Hence the elongated upper horns, the exaggerated toes, the lumpy/spiked structure above the spine, etc. But there's nothing wrong with people offering their suggestions. As long as it's constructive I don't see anything wrong with it.


    Blaine91555 --
    Thanks, I'm checking out his website now. Good stuff.
    Last edited by Agent00J; 06-03-07 at 10:07 AM.

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    very sweet , it looks very cool!
    zbrush is king

  7. #7

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    Been a little busy, but managed to do some more work on the model.
    I tried sharpening the beak, but I'm having some trouble with it. I'm still working on it though.
    beak_sharp.JPG

    Also, I've been trying to create folds in what would be the armpit area. This is what I have so far.
    armpit_test.JPG

    I'm not really happy with the folds and would appreciate some opinions/suggestions please.

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    Nice T-tops!

    I wouldn't sweat it too much about the folds under the armpits...nearly 99% of the attention your model gets is going to be focussed on what's initially visible in whatever "final render" you do upon completion...unless you plan on animating him.

    I really like what you have so far. Is he just for practice/fun, or are you planning on doing something with him (whole scene....?)

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    What he says is true, but if you're really concern about the wrinkles under the armpit I suppose you could make good use of the pinch, draw and tweak tool. Using the draw in areas that need to be increase in mass. Pinch tool to pinch the wrinkles together and tweak to move the wrinkles the way you want it.

  10. #10

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    Bravo bravo, I like . The Triceratops came out really nice man, but I agree with Karrma you should better indicate that the horns are not part of the skin and I think the tail should be flattened a little. After all that all I have to say is Tom's_Spring_Quarter_Zbrush_Class_Rocks!!! Lol, keep doing your thing homie. PEACE

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    very well done. excellent detailing so far. i wish i had that patience on my firsts.^^
    Last edited by zhaxen; 07-06-07 at 03:44 AM.

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    Nice Triceratops!

    I'm going to play devil's advocate here and say, How does anyone know that the horns were not completely covered by skin, as they are on deer at some times of the year? It might be interesting to have them with flaking, peeling skin at the tips, where clashes with other animals have worn it away. Look at the ZB Wiki tutorial of the eagle head; the way the feathers were made could be employed to generate the peelings.

    You want to create crisp folds and creases in the armpits. If you are working in ZB2, you need to size up your model by about 300% at the start of your session. For some reason this lets ZB2 recognise the accurate shape of your brush curve as it impacts on the polys under your cursor. Then you need to turn on Accurate Curve Mode in the Modifiers sub-pallette; and set your brush curve to a J shape, either by adding curve points, or by dragging the focal shift slider to the right. All of these settings will allow you to carve very naturalistic, crisp creases.

    Cheers,

    R

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